It's My Life

Eckel Nyamhondoro

4130

Stone: Fruit Serpentine

Dimensions: 14 x 11 x 4 inches

The sculpture is of a young girl who is being told what to do but wants to make her own decisions about her future.

MORE ABOUT THE STONE:

Every sculpture is made from natural stone and vary slightly due to nature of stone and natural grain which is part of the stone. Some stone will contain inclusions, pits or fissures as a result of its geological formation. The natural recurring iron/seaweed strata lines in the stone give the stone its character and makes it unique.

Natural lines are colorful lines formed within the stone. These are not flaws, but rather signifies the authenticity of the product. Only skilled sculptors are able to work with the stone due its hardness. The stone can withstands harsh weather conditions and can be placed in a natural environment.

NOTE: Typically your sculpture will ship within 2-3 days after you've placed your order.

ECKEL NYAMHONDORO

Born in 1972 in the Guruve district of Zimbabwe, a region with a strong sculpture tradition. At the age of twenty, Eckel joined his cousin Enos Chengo at his sculpting studio and stayed there for four years. It is during this time that he decided to devote his life to art. He later joined the Tengenenge Art Community where he was an active member for eight years. Eckel draws on Tribal mythology for inspiration and his pieces are of a spiritual contemplative nature.

A hallmark of his work is the elaborate detailing of many of his sculptures with intricate chiseling artwork.

His notable group exhibitions include Museum of Modern Art in San Diego in (1997), the Second Agio International Symposium (2005), the African Millennium Foundation Travelling Exhibition (2006), and the Kirstin Dihl competition. His international endeavors include representing Zimbabwe Art in Canada since 2001, German (2008) where he ran workshops teaching children from the ages of eight years to fifteen years of age. His work has been on galleries and collections in the USA, Europe Asia, and Africa.




Where the Stone is Found

How The Sculptures Are Created