About The Shona Sculpture Stone

You will find that these sculptures are not only aesthetically pleasing but also have an interesting story behind them as they were all handmade by Shona artists who live near the mines where this particular type of rock was extracted. These pieces are truly one-of-a-kind!

The artist has been carving for over 20 years and her work has been exhibited internationally including at the Smithsonian Museum of African Art in Washington DC and at galleries across Europe. She uses traditional techniques passed down through generations to create these unique masterpieces you won't find anywhere else on earth!

The typical Shona stone is an abundant material in Zimbabwe, with much of the stone coming from the counties “Great Dyke”. This geological formation which stretches along Lake Kariba on Zimbabwe's southern border with Zambia contains some 375 minerals plus fossils dating back 500 million years ago

Shona sculptures come in many shapes and sizes, as they are usually carved from pieces of stone that vary considerably. The stones most often used in Shona sculpture are sandstone, serpentine and granite.

The sculptures are made from the hardest of the shona stones, which, along with its softer brown outer layer, make it very popular with sculptors. Although found in several areas, springstone is mined in Guruve by hand. It is a dark stone and due to its density can be polished up to a high shine.